Hi everyone, my name's Rachel. This blog just consists of stuff that interests me personally, mostly reblogs that are undoubtedly heavy on Christoph Waltz content. Nothing too exciting here!

26th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Christoph the last gentleman with 48 notes

malibu-linda:

What the…??? I can’t handle this!!!

He looks like a young August Rosenbluth in the bottom one.

Source: christophfanalways

26th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Christoph Waltz with 75 notes

dama-do-lago:

x Christoph Waltz x Water for Elephants (2011)

Source: dama-do-lago

24th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Christoph Waltz with 318 notes

Source: shomangaka

24th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Christoph Waltz with 461 notes

gentlenight:

from der humpink

Source: gentlenight

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Toys of the '80s with 50 notes


Glo Worm

Glo Worm

Tagged: I had this and loved it!

23rd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Christoph Waltz with 72 notes

Source: fuckyeahwaltz

23rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Cute images with 821 notes

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from FuckYeahVintage-Retro with 28,807 notes

fuckyeahvintage-retro:

The Evolution of Women’s Hairstyles

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Christoph Waltz with 137 notes

Some profileporn and sweaterporn to keep us up at night.

Source: chrsitophwaltz

21st July 2014

Photo reblogged from LINGUISTICS Y'ALL with 213,795 notes

whosaprettypolyglot:

maskedlinguist:

lindentreeisle:

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

LINGUISTIC BITCHSLAP.

Thank you. I was too lazy to find my post.

Fun related fact - the meaning of the word “November” in several Slavic languages (and “October” in Croatian because fuck you that’s why) - variations on listopad - is also named for falling leaves, list being “leaf” and pad being “fall”.

whosaprettypolyglot:

maskedlinguist:

lindentreeisle:

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

LINGUISTIC BITCHSLAP.

Thank you. I was too lazy to find my post.

Fun related fact - the meaning of the word “November” in several Slavic languages (and “October” in Croatian because fuck you that’s why) - variations on listopad - is also named for falling leaves, list being “leaf” and pad being “fall”.

Source: pleatedjeans